Gaybombay’s Weblog

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gay_bombay/

Archive for July 2009

What happens when a guy falls for his sister’s fiance?

leave a comment »

What happens when a guy falls for his sister’s fiance?

By: Debarati Palit Date: 2009-07-31 Place: Pune

The Guide chatted up with Abhijit Chowdhary, whose latest play is a humorous take on issues surrounding homosexuality and the changing attitude towards it

Hindi theatre group, Swatantra Theatre, is presenting Zamana Badal Gaya, a comedy on homosexuality.

Directed by Abhijit Chowdhary, it deals with social problems faced by the gay community. The plot revolves around a college-going boy named Suraj, who is a homosexual, and faces a dilemma when his sister Sushma is about to get married to Mohan, the person Suraj has set his eyes on. The entry of a surprise character gives a twist to the story.

Abhijit Chowdhary, Founder of Swatantra Theatre and director of Zamana Badal Gaya, states that the idea of staging this play happened during a discussion on Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, which was decriminalised on July 2 by Delhi High Court. It sought punishment of up to 10 years for any kind of sexual intercourse against the order of nature.

The members of Swatantra Theatre unanimously decided that such a play is apt for the times and should be presented in a humorous manner. But they had not counted on the challenge of presenting a sensitive issue in a comic format.

http://www.mid-day.com/imagedata/2009/jul/puneplay.jpg
A still from Zamana Badal Gaya

"Homosexuality is normal but there is a section of society that still does not support it. We are not opposing or supporting any concept, but just giving a humorous touch to a cause. In the past, we had solely focused on serious plays, such as Bhagat Singh, and we wanted to do something different. But we didn’t want to hurt anyone’s sentiments either. If we presented a sensitive topic in a serious manner, we would have had to stand up and prove someone wrong," adds Chowdhary, elaborating on why they chose the format of a comic play for presenting such a sensitive issue.

Zamana Badal Gaya will be staged on Friendship Day to boost its appeal to the youth. At the end of the play, the homosexual characters are happily accepted by their friends and roommates, which Chowdhary thinks is a big gift for someone on Friendship Day.

The play has been getting mixed reactions so far, but the crew members and actors have taken it as a challenge to present it with full confidence and are sure that the audiences will accept it.

At: Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Sanskruti Bhawan, near Maldhaka Chowk, Sasson Hospital, Station Road.
On: August 2, from 7 pm to 8.30 pm
Call: 9923643335
Cost: Rs 150

Email: moderator@gaybombay.in

Web Sites:

www.gaybombay.in

www.gaybombay.info

www.gayindia.org

E Groups:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gay_bombay

http://groups.google.com/group/Gaybombay

GB Internet Radio

http://www.gaybombay.in/gbradio

Gaybombay breaking news and annoucements

http://labs.google.co.in/smschannels/subscribe/Gaybombay

Emergency Helpline number 9820565885

Orkut:

http://www.orkut.co.in/Main#Community.aspx?cmm=22091955

Blogs:

http://gaybombay.blogspot.com

https://gaybombay.wordpress.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/gaybombay

Facebook

facebook.com/gaybombay

image00117

Written by gaybombay

July 31, 2009 at 2:09 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Q&A: “Every Work Form You Fill Asks Your Marital Status”

leave a comment »

Q&A: "Every Work Form You Fill Asks Your Marital Status"
Ann Ninan interviews LESLEY ESTEVES, a queer activist

http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=47877

NEW DELHI, Jul 29 (IPS) – When the New Delhi High Court amended Article 377 of the Indian Penal Code, a colonial-era law which was used to criminalise consensual homosexual relationships, on Jul. 2, it was a "life-changing moment for me," says Lesley Esteves, a journalist and queer activist based in New Delhi.

For the first time, a constitutional authority spoke up "so forcefully for my community," she asserts.

The ruling applies to New Delhi, but it sets a precedent for the legal establishment across the country. Already, there are attempts being made by the religious right-wing and political parties to scuttle it.

IPS interviewed Esteves about being a queer woman, the judgement and heterosexuality in India.

IPS: The judgement on Article 377 is a victory for basic rights to privacy, non discrimination and liberty.

LESLEY ESTEVES: My community has lived under the shadow of criminalisation for 150 years. The only ‘crimes’ (we) committed were refusing to adhere to gender norms laid down by one section of our society – be it in dress, speech, behaviour or choice of sexual partner.

These norms were for long claimed to be sanctified by religion, the basis of their enforcement in law. These norms are nothing but prejudices, which ultimately aim to create unequal societies.

The writers of the Constitution of India hoped to prevent the prejudices of one set of the Indian people from oppressing another set of people, and they wrote the protections into law through the Fundamental Rights available to all Indians. The Delhi High Court upheld that spirit of inclusiveness and tolerance for diversity, by effectively agreeing that Section 377 could no longer be used as a tool of discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

IPS: What would you say about patriarchy and being queer in India?

LE: A queer person is quite simply defined as any person who falls outside of, and foul of, the patriarchal notions of family and gender roles.

That’s why we use the word ‘queer’, which is a much broader term than gay or LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender). This challenge marginalises not only gay and transgender people, but also single women, single men, straight couples who want to live together and not get married, straight people who reject unequal marriage laws, straight people who reject conventional gender roles, etc.

The way that conventional marriage operates, especially in the Indian context, seems to be more about resource preservation and applying privileges of citizenship to only one set of people, than about a relationship.

This is seen in how most faiths, law and government regulations recognise only one family system. Only a marriage involving one man with one woman can be sanctified and accorded protection from social or economic discrimination.

The queer struggle is to end this hegemony, and to enable equality for all kinds of consensual relationships, family structures and gender behaviours. It is a struggle closely reflected in the issues the women’s movement also grapples with. Therefore, in metro cities like Delhi, Bombay, Lucknow and Calcutta, you notice partnerships between queer rights and women’s rights groups.

IPS: Can you tell me a little about yourself.

LE: I have been open about my sexual identity since the age of 15, when my parents discovered I was gay. In the workplace, I wish I could have chosen otherwise, but I never wanted to be counted as heterosexual.

It’s not evident to most how much heterosexuality hegemonises the discourse in the workplace. Every work form you fill asks your marital status; every colleague you meet asks the same question.

And of course, some colleagues have access to facilities that I don’t. I can’t claim medical benefits for my partner under company schemes, the way they do for their spouses.

One of my very first jobs was that of a sales person for email in Bombay. Those were the days when email was a product to be sold! They asked me to leave after a couple of weeks because I refused to change the way I dress. They wanted me to dress ‘more like a woman’. My mother told me, let nobody ever tell you how you can and can’t dress. So I chose to quit instead.

IPS: Will the ruling open a small window even for queer women outside metro India, in less anonymous towns and smaller cities.

LE: Women from all social contexts and classes in India have been trying to carve out queer existences, whether in the village or by migrating towards the big cities where there are greater chances of community support.

In Delhi and Mumbai, often we have had to support couples escaping family pressure in interior Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana. We fully expect such cases to rise, now that the court has sent a message to queer Indians that the courts can and will uphold their rights. (END/2009)

Email: moderator@gaybombay.in

Web Sites:

www.gaybombay.in

www.gaybombay.info

www.gayindia.org

E Groups:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gay_bombay

http://groups.google.com/group/Gaybombay

GB Internet Radio

http://www.gaybombay.in/gbradio

Gaybombay breaking news and annoucements

http://labs.google.co.in/smschannels/subscribe/Gaybombay

Emergency Helpline number 9820565885

Orkut:

http://www.orkut.co.in/Main#Community.aspx?cmm=22091955

Blogs:

http://gaybombay.blogspot.com

https://gaybombay.wordpress.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/gaybombay

Facebook

facebook.com/gaybombay

Written by gaybombay

July 30, 2009 at 12:12 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Low response expected for Aug 16 Mumbai gay parade

leave a comment »

Low response expected for Aug 16 gay parade

By: Varun Singh Date: 2009-07-26 Place: Mumbai

http://www.mid-day.com/news/2009/jul/260709-August-16th-gay-pride-parade-low-response-Mumbai-news.htm

Activists say that the Gay parade scheduled for August 16 will not see a surge in response despite the recent Delhi High Court ruling. About 1,000 gays including supporters, activists and people from other metros like Bangalore, Delhi and Kolkata are expected to participate. Others will stay indoors because of the perceived stigma attached to the word gay.

http://www.mid-day.com/imagedata/2009/jul/pride1.jpg
Celebrations in Bombay just after the HC ruling Pic/Pradeep Dhivar

About 600 people from the gay community and their supporters gathered to be a part of last year’s gay parade.

Pallav Patankar, one of the organisers and the trustee of Humsafar Trust, said that this year’s crowd would be 1,000-strong. "There are fears that they might be targeted and that religious groups might create a problem," said Patankar.

People from the gay community say that the Delhi gay parade was threatened by a right wing group; this might have an adverse affect on Mumbaikars.

Jasmeer Thakur of Samabhawana Society argues that media mostly talk about gays and lesbians in a sexual content. "Most gays stay away because they are portrayed as transgender. A gay is also a regular 9 to 5 man who will soon come out after everyone behaves sensibly, including the media and religious gurus. If all this is tackled, the parades will see a surge."

However, activists like Geeta Kumana of Aanchal, that works with lesbians, even thousand is a good number.

Vikram Phukan, editor of Bombay Dost, claims the numbers will be larger. "We still have three weeks and if it is publicised properly, there will be a good count."

Email: moderator@gaybombay.in

Web Sites:

www.gaybombay.in

www.gaybombay.info

www.gayindia.org

E Groups:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gay_bombay

http://groups.google.com/group/Gaybombay

GB Internet Radio

http://www.gaybombay.in/gbradio

Gaybombay breaking news and annoucements

http://labs.google.co.in/smschannels/subscribe/Gaybombay

Emergency Helpline number 9820565885

Orkut:

http://www.orkut.co.in/Main#Community.aspx?cmm=22091955

Blogs:

http://gaybombay.blogspot.com

https://gaybombay.wordpress.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/gaybombay

Facebook

facebook.com/gaybombay

image00116

Written by gaybombay

July 27, 2009 at 12:59 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Alternative sexuality is latest literary subject: Neel Mukherjee

leave a comment »

Alternative sexuality is latest literary subject: Neel Mukherjee 2009-07-26 12:31:00

Writer-reviewer Neel Mukherjee, the joint winner of the Vodafone-Crossword Books Award 2008 along with novelist Amitav Ghosh, feels that writings on alternative sexuality are gradually coming out of the closet in India.

‘I would like to believe it (writing freely about alternative sexuality) is a trend in India. The English-educated urban centres are seeing liberalism. It’s a good thing. I consciously wanted to have a gay protagonist in my novel,’ Mukherjee told IANS on phone from Mumbai.

His book ‘Past Continuous’ — the saga of a lonely young gay man who flees a miserable life in Kolkata to the freedom of Britain — won the Vodafone-Crossword award in the best English fiction category along with Ghosh’s ‘Sea of Poppies’ Thursday.

The London-based author, who has made Britain his home for the last 17 years, feels that a lot has been written about alternative sexuality in India, but society is still not comfortable with such relationships.

‘Gay activist Salim Kidwai has written an important book (‘Same Sex Love in India’), though it is not fiction. Penguin has published its anthologies of gay and lesbian writings and publishers like Kali and Zubaan will soon take the lead in lesbian writing. A lot of things are going on in India about rights, equality and Article 377, which was so long in the background.

‘But personally, England kind of liberated me into writing so openly about homosexuality. In India, there is still the cultural air (conventions) that you breathe,’ Mukherjee said.

The 38-year old writer, who has been educated in Kolkata (Jadavpur University) , Oxford and Cambridge, shot to fame as a fiction reviewer for The Times, London, and Time Magazine-Asia. He is also a contributing editor for The Boston Review.

‘The fiction reviews keep me going though I have cut down on the numbers. It is difficult to describe a book in 400 words these days. It just becomes soundbytes,’ says Mukherjee.

His novel is about an orphan called Ritwik Ghosh, who grows up in the bylanes of south Kolkata amid a crowd of suspicious and nosy relatives.

He escapes to Oxford on a scholarship, but grows up suddenly as he discovers his true self and chooses to be an illegal gay wanderer on the streets of London and in its public toilets.

Mukherjee also touches upon issues of illegal immigrants, corporal punishment and aggressive mother and child bonds — and brings Ritwik in contact with a senile old Englishwoman, Anne Cameron, who journeys to India to delve into the shared colonial legacy of India and Britain.

‘I poured my heart into creating Anne Cameron. She has suffered so much and the character Ritwik has a lot of me in him. I love imagining other people’s lives and stepping into their minds. I wanted a lot of outsiders and loners in my book — who are alienated,’ said Mukherjee, who also lost his parents like his protagonist.

Mukherjee started writing the book in 2001 after a course in creative writing at the University of East Anglia.

‘But it took a long time for the book to be published. In 2003-2004, Shruti Devi of Picador India picked up the book and it was finally released in January 2008. The book, however, sold quite late last year,’ Mukherjee said.

His British publishers Constable & Robinson will bring out the book in early 2010 under a new title ‘A Life Apart’.

Although the protagonist of his novel is a Bengali from Kolkata, Mukherjee himself is an unlikely Bengali.

‘I don’t feel like going back to Kolkata — it’s too crowded. The only thing I miss are Satyajit Ray’s books (‘Feluda’ and ‘Professor Shanku’ series). He was probably one of the greatest writers of our childhood,’ says Mukherjee.

He insists that his only connect with Bengal ‘is the proficiency in Bengali language and its cuisine’ but his next novel is also set in Kolkata.

‘I can cook almost all kinds of Bengali food. I think Bengali food is international,’ says the writer, whose hobbies are cooking and reading.

Mukherjee’s favourite authors are ‘lesser known, like American writers James Salter, Richard Yates and William Maxwell; Mohammed Hanif of Pakistan and the Norwegian writer Per Petterson’.

(Madhusree Chatterjee can be contacted at madhu.c@ians.in)

Email: moderator@gaybombay.in

Web Sites:

www.gaybombay.in

www.gaybombay.info

www.gayindia.org

E Groups:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gay_bombay

http://groups.google.com/group/Gaybombay

GB Internet Radio

http://www.gaybombay.in/gbradio

Gaybombay breaking news and annoucements

http://labs.google.co.in/smschannels/subscribe/Gaybombay

Emergency Helpline number 9820565885

Orkut:

http://www.orkut.co.in/Main#Community.aspx?cmm=22091955

Blogs:

http://gaybombay.blogspot.com

https://gaybombay.wordpress.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/gaybombay

Facebook

facebook.com/gaybombay

Written by gaybombay

July 27, 2009 at 12:41 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Soon ‘gay novelist’ will sound backward

leave a comment »

Soon ‘gay novelist’ will sound backward

Namita Devidayal, TNN 26 July 2009, 12:16am IST

|

It is a debut novel that is being described as "searing, savage and gut-wrenching”. Novelist Neel Mukherjee took the literary world by surprise

when his book Past Continuous jointly won the Vodafone Crossword Fiction Prize, upping veteran writers like Jhumpa Lahiri and Salman Rushdie. In the novel, a young gay Bengali student in Kolkata gets his ticket to freedom when he wins a scholarship to Oxford.

As he struggles to build a new life, old ghosts, especially that of an abusive mother, haunt him. In its review of the book Bibilio said, "Instead of the cloying nostalgia that fills so much diasporic fiction, we have a hard, painful hatred, a desire to burn the past into the bitter ashes of the cremation-ground.”

The Kolkata-born Mukherjee, who lives between the US and the UK, was in Mumbai this week to accept the award. In an email interview he talks about, among other things, why the term gay novelist in an antiquated one.

Q. Tell us about the process of writing the book. How much of it was autobiographical? After all, you also made the journey from Kolkata to England.

A. The process was the usual (and very boring) one of turning on the computer or, in my case, mostly, uncapping a pen, turning a fresh page, and beginning to write. Following some story I’d heard about Graham Greene, I tried to write 500 words every day but it was never as regimented and disciplined as that. Most days yielded 200, some rare ones, 1000.

Yes, there is a lot of me in Ritwik, one of the two protagonists of the novel, but one wouldn’t get very far pursuing one-to-one correspondences.

Q. This is the first openly gay novel coming out of India. Also, you dedicated your award to the Naaz Foundation and its fight for gay rights. Please talk about that space.

A. Is this really the first openly gay novel in India? Surely not! If you follow historians such as Saleem Kidwai, you’ll find out that gay writing has been there for a very long time. As for the term `gay novel’, while I don’t dispute it at all, I find Ritwik’s homosexuality of decidedly less importance than the book’s other themes: mothers and sons, alienation, loneliness, outsiders, home and homelessness, exile.

Yes, I dedicated my award to the Naaz Foundation and the nameless lawyers who have carried on the long, exhausting battle for equality. In that sense, it is not so much about `gay rights’ as about equality. My position is that of Amartya Sen’s, as outlined in that astonishing open letter he wrote in 2006 (or was it 2007?). And as a novelist who also happens to be gay, I think it’s time for us to stand up and be counted. Besides, we don’t use the terms `woman novelist’ or `female novel’ any more; hopefully, in the not too distant future the term `gay novel’ or `gay novelist’ will seem equally antiquated and backward.

Q. Can you talk about the city as a metaphor. What does one leave behind when they leave a city?

A. Gosh, this is a very big question and I don’t feel this is the right space to address it. To answer the second half of the question: one leaves behind a past, a history, a context, the very matrices of one’s being up to that point in time before departure. But they’re always present, so `leaving behind’ is illusory. You may leave them behind but they don’t leave you; they live inside you forever.

Q. You novel ends morbidly in an act of extreme racial violence. Why did you feel the need to do that?

A. I hope not `morbid’ but I can’t answer this question without a `spoiler alert’. Suffice it to say that the book continues, very deliberately so, after this act of `extreme racial violence’, in the final chapter of the historical narrative. What does that say about the book?

Q. How do you feel about winning this award? What comes next for you?

A. Thrilled and delighted. What comes next is the UK publication of this novel, under the title A Life Apart, in January 2010. I’m also working with a Bengali artist on a graphic novel. And writing my second novel, which, needless to say, is going very, very slowly.

Email: moderator@gaybombay.in

Web Sites:

www.gaybombay.in

www.gaybombay.info

www.gayindia.org

E Groups:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gay_bombay

http://groups.google.com/group/Gaybombay

GB Internet Radio

http://www.gaybombay.in/gbradio

Gaybombay breaking news and annoucements

http://labs.google.co.in/smschannels/subscribe/Gaybombay

Emergency Helpline number 9820565885

Orkut:

http://www.orkut.co.in/Main#Community.aspx?cmm=22091955

Blogs:

http://gaybombay.blogspot.com

https://gaybombay.wordpress.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/gaybombay

Facebook

facebook.com/gaybombay

Written by gaybombay

July 26, 2009 at 12:54 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Parenting/Yuva mags focus on homosexuaity

leave a comment »

Courtesy movenpick

(i) Volume 17, No. 9, July 2009 issue of Parenting
(http://parentingindia.com), India’s homegrown magazine on pregnancy,
baby and child issues, now in its 17th year, has a very sensible
article "Talking to Kids about Being Gay" on how to bring up sexual
orientation topics with pre-school and school-age kids. Note that
this issue came out before the 377 judgement. Some quotes…

"… most parents would agree that it’s always important to teach our
kids that all people must be treated fairly, humanely and with
respect"

"… there’s always the possibility that one of your children could,
in fact, be gay. And no doubt you’ll want them to know that they are
still loved and treasured as individuals. You’ll also be hoping that
they don’t some day face terrible discrimination, verbal or physical
abuse. As well. you may have a friend, relative of acquaintance, who
is openly or quietly gay, and you’ll want to ensure that they’re not
offended by our own family’s ill-informed remarks…. and frankly
you’ll want to ensure that your kids don’t exhibit unnecessary fear,
ignorance or cruelty… when faced with eunuchs on the streets".

"Experts note that it’s not always necessary to actually talk about
sex with you’re discussing sexual orientation with kids… [i]t’s more
important for children to understand that a loving relationship can
sometimes be shared between two men or two women, in a similar way
that men and women, who are heterosexual, care for each other".

(ii) Vol 1, Issue 6, July 16, 2009 of Yuva, billed as The Magazine for
Young India, has an editorial and a series of articles on the cover
theme ‘Gay and Free: young homosexuals look forward to a guilt-free
future’

Surprisingly homoerotic (for a mainstream youth magazine: I first
spotted it in the hands of teenage girl at the bookstall in Delhi
airport) cover at
http://zoneyuva.com/images/stories/yuva-coveraug1.jpg

The lead article by Shalini Seth has quotes from several lgbt-india
and khush listmembers including Nitin Karani, Geeta Kumana, Vikram
Doctor and Parmesh Shahani. There’s also a nice first-person essay
"What the Regular Guy wants" by Keith Fernandez. about the 377 ruling
and how it’s changed him "…no more trawling for sexual fulfillment
behind grimy toilets. No more groping around in the dark in
neighbourhood buildings".

Check these magazines out, and if possible, consider writing to them
appreciating their inclusion of LGBT content.

Email: moderator@gaybombay.in

Web Sites:

www.gaybombay.in

www.gaybombay.info

www.gayindia.org

E Groups:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gay_bombay

http://groups.google.com/group/Gaybombay

GB Internet Radio

http://www.gaybombay.in/gbradio

Gaybombay breaking news and annoucements

http://labs.google.co.in/smschannels/subscribe/Gaybombay

Emergency Helpline number 9820565885

Orkut:

http://www.orkut.co.in/Main#Community.aspx?cmm=22091955

Blogs:

http://gaybombay.blogspot.com

https://gaybombay.wordpress.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/gaybombay

Facebook

facebook.com/gaybombay

Written by gaybombay

July 25, 2009 at 4:49 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

India’s first India’s first LGBT pride store launched online

leave a comment »

India’s first India’s first LGBT pride store launched online

By: Aastha Atray Banan Date: 2009-07-25 Place: Mumbai

http://www.mid-day.com/news/2009/jul/250709-Azaad-Bazaar-Gays-Gifts-Online.html

What does the average Indian homosexual do when he wants to gift a special something to his lover? Simran and Sabina of Azaad Bazaar have the answer

Sabina and Simran, partners and founders of Azaad Bazaar, India’s only LGBT (Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender) pride store, couldn’t stop smiling on the morning of July 2, when the Delhi High Court

http://www.mid-day.com/imagedata/2009/jul/azzad-v-neck.jpg
The Azaad T-shirt, an expression of freedom (Rs 399)

decriminalised Section 377 of the IPC, which sought punishment of up to 10 years for any kind of sexual intercourse against the order of nature. Their online store, which caters to "everyone gay or straight", aims to be one that tries to give the average Indian gay an "identity that he/she can flaunt with pride". "You can always buy a souvenir or a cute gift from a pride store in the US, but how does that reflect the Indianness?" asks Sabina.

The Mumbai-based entrepreneurs launched the brand in February this year, and their online shopping portal went live 10 days ago. The two say they are surprised at the response from straight customers who are interested in the merchandise. They have had straight women buying the Maa Da Ladla tees for their boyfriends and husbands. Straight men have walked in at exhibitions they’ve hosted in the past, inquired about the 377 ruckus and walked away with shopping bags full of goods. "It’s a great way to break the ice. Straight and gay people harbour misconceptions about each other, but when we start talking, it just gets easier," says Sabina.
Probably a first in the South Asia region, the website has received hits from all over India, even from the supposedly conservative North East and the South. "Other than the metros, we’ve received enquiries from smaller towns, where most gays haven’t come out of the closet. It also helps that the website has a clean, safe look. We don’t sell sex toys. It’s all about cute, funky accessories and tees that send out a message without being preachy," says Simran.

product prices range from Rs 30 to Rs 1,500. Log on to www.azaadbazaar.com to place your order.

Email: moderator@gaybombay.in

Web Sites:

www.gaybombay.in

www.gaybombay.info

www.gayindia.org

E Groups:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gay_bombay

http://groups.google.com/group/Gaybombay

GB Internet Radio

http://www.gaybombay.in/gbradio

Gaybombay breaking news and annoucements

http://labs.google.co.in/smschannels/subscribe/Gaybombay

Emergency Helpline number 9820565885

Orkut:

http://www.orkut.co.in/Main#Community.aspx?cmm=22091955

Blogs:

http://gaybombay.blogspot.com

https://gaybombay.wordpress.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/gaybombay

Facebook

facebook.com/gaybombay

image00115

Written by gaybombay

July 25, 2009 at 4:29 pm

Posted in Uncategorized